Controversial – Obroni tears down Ghana and builds it up again

Standard

I was compelled to republish Ian Kwaku Utley article which I posted on my blog a few days ago because of the sensation it’s created across the world wide web amongst Ghanaians in the diaspora and at home.

5 LESSONS I HAVE LEARNED AFTER READING IAN UTLEY’S ARTICLE

1. The rules of engagement (trade, foreign policy) between Africa and the West Need to Change. The African Union and our respective Governments should lead the way. Ghana should be at the forefront of this change. We need to set the rules for the West if they want to trade with us. WE MUST UNITE AS A COUNTRY, REGION AND CONTINENT. WITHOUT UNITY WE CANNOT PROGRESS

2. You teach people how to treat you. White people mistreated (slavery, colonialism and westernisation) Africans because we allowed it to happen. When you go into someone’s home and the head of the household has established rules, you will comply. We have never set any rules for white people to comply to in our countries. Yet when we go to western country they have set rules and regulations for us. It’s time we do the same.

3. Zimbabwe in my mind is the only African country that has successfully told the West to ‘take a hike’ . Watch Zimbabwe in the next few years, they will be leading Africa’s industrial and economic transformation. Robert Mugabe made the right choice by telling Tony Blair to Keep his Britain whilst he kept his Zimbabwe. I never understood the significance of his statement until I read this article. It’s probably why African leaders still hold reverence and respect for him. It’s because Mugabe had the balls to tell the white man to abide by his country’s rules.

4. Africans are more powerful than we know. Our transformation will truly begin if we are bold and demand what rightfully belongs to us (our resources, and the right to set the rules to trade. The we need to regain our power to manage our resources, economy and countries. BUY MADE IN GHANA AND AFRICA GOODS AND SERVICES.

5. It’s important that we begin to write our own stories. Lets not leave it to others to tell us what and who we are about. Learn about our history and about why we should take pride in being called Africans. Teach your children about our rich and diverse past,both the good and the bad. Knowledge of our history will serve as the the springboard for our continent’s development.
Perhaps you could draw your own lessons…

An expat friend of mine forwarded the link to this article to me which she discovered on this website

I only repost articles that aren’t my own if I think that my readers would benefit from reading it. I ask that you read this post to the end before you make any comments. The lessons I’ve written above will make more sense once you’ve read the entire article.  -Kate Nkansa

“What do you want in Ghana? Go back to your country!”

Continue reading

Advertisements

Zhest Consult Welcomes Kyla Hagedorn

Standard

There is an old  African Proverb which states:

I started my consultancy business two years ago. Since then I’ve been looking for a worthy person to include as a  business partner. To my delight I was introduced to Kyla Hagedorn in 2012 and during that period we’ve worked together on a few initiatives and also forged a mutual respect and friendship.

Continue reading

Ghana, The Centre of the World

Standard

All functional movements are highly dependent on the core.  Our human bodies rely on the strength from our core to function well. Ghana is the centre of the world, and the centre does not hold.

Centres of excellence, within our Arts, Music and Film, Science, Politics, Education, Industry and the Environment.

hmmm…

Continue reading

Kantamanto is on Fire

Standard

Kantamanto is the largest second hand market in Ghana. In the west you’d compare Kantamanto to one gigantic thrift store with second hand wares from all over the world.

During my university days I recall galavanting along the streets of melville and greenside (South Africa) in search of great vintage clothing. The only reason I’ve only been to this market twice during my two and a half years in Ghana is the very reason you’re watching this video. The place is congested  very difficult to walk through and its even more of a nightmare to maneuver  through when it rains, there  are no safety exits and it’s very crowded.

Continue reading

An Interview with a Player

Standard

This past week I read countless articles about the high rate of AIDS infection in Sub Saharan Africa and the increase in orphans due to the aids pandemic. What I find astounding is that out of the 22 million people living with AIDS and HIV, 12 million of those infected are women and 1.8 million are children (statistics taken from 2007 data). It has forced me to think about relations between men and women, whether the path we are travelling as society is sustainable, productive and beneficial to the progress and prosperity of our continent.  It has also prompted me to ask how we as men and women have contributed to the degradation of our society, which is evident in the high number of people that are HIV positive. For those who are thinking that this will be a male bashing article I assure you that I will be objective  about this topic.

Continue reading

Divorced Before 30

Standard

According to an article written in the New York Times  more marriages dissolve before the age of thirty. This trend is growing in Africa. How many young people in their twenties do you know who are going through separation or divorce after less than 5 years of marriage? What are some of the underlying factors contributing to such a growing trend? Feint & Margin had the opportunity to speak to a young twenty something year old about her marriage and divorce. Kate Nkansa talks to Miss T*  a twenty seven year old woman from South Africa who is divorced and under thirty.

Below is our conversation.https://i1.wp.com/feintandmargin.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/Miss-T.jpg

Continue reading

Kate Nkansa Interviews Ghanaian Photographer Emmanuel Bobbie

Standard

Emmanuel Bobbie is a Ghanaian Photographer who is the CEO of Bob Pixel Photography.  He is a husband and father of two to young boys.

I discovered Emmanuel’s work through his Facebook page and I was blown away by his photography. He is an artist who knows how to capture his subject soul. Every photo he takes tells a story. It is evident in the way his subjects surrender to his camera and open themselves to the lens.

I would describe Emmanuel’s work as the standard photographers in Ghana should measure themselves with.

Continue reading